Friday, June 13, 2014

Ten Hours Left

That's right, only ten more hours on my Goodreads Giveaway, so don't miss out!

Once again I'm falling in love with the characters I'm writing. Mage Assassin is going well. So far, my husband's response to it is, "This is great. There needs to be more of it," which is the most positive thing he's ever said of a first draft of mine. So I'm wrestling to make more of it while also helping with our current move.

Speaking of how little time I have to throw around right now, I'm going to leave you with something I wrote today that I'm pretty proud of, though it has nothing to do with anything that I normally talk about here--feminism, how to respond to guys, and compassion. There's a phone line called bell hook hotline. Here's what I have to say about it:

Bell Hooks was an awesome woman, but I don't care for the spirit of the bell hooks hotline. Bell Hooks wanted us to feel compassion for one another, and I feel handing out a false number (even one that responds to texts with feminist quotes) is not spreading compassion but more mistrust between genders.

Wouldn't it be better to tell the man, when he asks for your number, that it's not his fault, but you aren't interested? Not all men ask for women's numbers for a one-night-stand, many do so to ask you out for coffee, to see what you're like and see if they would like to pursue a relationship with you. And should we punish this behavior with deception and disappointment?

Of course if it's obvious they're only going for a hook-up you need not accept. But if that's the case, take a look around and see where you are. Is it at a bar, drinking, wearing hot make-up and skimpy clothing? Certainly I'm not implying you're "asking for it," but I would say you're sending out the wrong message, that you're just looking for a good time.

My point: be upfront. Handing out false numbers is not going to "educate men on how to correctly behave around women," it will only further their mistrust of us, and deepen their rage toward us.

“For me, forgiveness and compassion are always linked: how do we hold people accountable for wrongdoing and yet at the same time remain in touch with their humanity enough to believe in their capacity to be transformed?”
― Bell Hooks